Antique American Colonial Home Inspiration

I’m always on the prowl for inspiration for our house and finding others who have restored their antique homes. There are so many amazing ideas out there!

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This Hudson Valley historic home designed by Jersey Ice Cream Co. (a design team I am OBSESSED with) has the most amazing built-ins, stripped down to bare wood. We have lots of built ins (they are pretty standard for antique homes) but ours don’t look like this. Jealous.

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Also from Jersey Ice Cream Co. is this gorgeous inky blue paneled powder room in an antique Catskills home.

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This keeping room reminds me a lot of ours – a similar long, narrow space and difficult-to-style mantel! I love their warm rug and the way they coped with the tough fireplace space by decorating with dishes.

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If only we could find reclaimed stones for our front steps as perfect as these!

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This is a vintage light fixture from 1968, but it works beautifully in this antique home. I’m always on the prowl for star accents. They (almost) always work in a colonial setting.

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From the same home, a lovely pencil post bed in a bedroom with minimal styling. I’d love to find a bed like this in king size for our bedroom. While there are lots of reasonably-priced full and queen size, king is very elusive. And note the star light fixture on the wall! These folks clearly feel the same way about stars that I do.

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I love the moody but bright color scheme in this antique home turned inn in Maine.

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Also in Maine is this gorgeously updated kitchen in a home from 1754. Adding a kitchen in an antique home is such a challenge, given that in the 18th century folks just cooked in the keeping room over the large fireplace. These homeowners really have provided some great inspiration for our upcoming kitchen renovation. I love how neutral, clean and in keeping with the age of the home this kitchen is. The industrial fixtures aren’t my jam for our kitchen and I have a great (and reasonable) fear of etching marble countertops, but the simple cabinet profile, bright white color scheme and warm wood work so well.  And I’m very impressed they even managed to do some understated recessed lighting.

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Here is woodwork for days in the same restored Maine antique. I’m noticing a pattern in my favorite color choices! This looks remarkably like our entry in the cover image for this post.

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The dining room in this home has a great light fixture. I’d love to find a couple smaller versions of this for over our kitchen island. The simple Windsor chairs and handmade table are lovely here, a great example of mixing natural and painted wood. Though I would add a rug. I love everything about this house except that it doesn’t have enough rugs. But I’m a rug addict, so to each their own!

I can’t find a source for this image, but what a gorgeous patio on this colonial home!  I’m assuming this place is antique because no modern homeowner in their right mind would install a cedar shingle roof.  We’re looking to replace our roof, and it’s basically like saving up to put our house through college.

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This homeowner, Phoebe Troyer, created a beautiful antique reproduction home. I really appreciate the transition from the white painted floor in the entry to the wood floor in the living room. I also envy this spare style.  I’m a less is more person when it comes to spaces I love, but can’t escape my ‘more is more’ impulses  in real life.

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We have lots of shaker peg rails in our house, as well as a number of shaker peg pieces we found stashed in a closet that we can incorporate down the line. Here’s a lovely way to use them from the 200 year old Canterbury Shaker Village in New Hampshire.

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This Hudson Valley home has great décor, and is right up my alley with this combo of mid-century furniture in an antique space! Though I ask, again, what all these antique homeowners have against rugs? RUGS FOREVER…

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Bathrooms are tough in a historic home because (surprise!) there was no indoor plumbing in that era. This cast-iron tub with gorgeous patina works well, despite being more Victorian than colonial.

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This is great landscaping combined with a historic black exterior on this antique home. I’m a big, big fan of boxwoods, and they were popular in the 18th century. Historically accurate AND beautiful? Sounds good to me!

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Another antique-looking home with beautiful mid-century furniture – like the pairing of this safari chair with wood paneling.

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And, finally, the ultimate on any antique-lovers’ wish list, original Rufus Porter murals in this antique home, located on the North Shore of Massachusetts.  The dream!

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